My training plan lists week 12 as a recovery week. That means the weekend long run was “only” 12 miles. I signed up for the Hamptons Half because I figured 13.1 was close enough to 12 and using the water stations that a race provides would be good practice. The race is something of a tradition in my little group of friends. Here’s a recap of the race in 2014 and this is a recap of when I ran the Hamptons 5K in 2015 post-ankle injury. (I skipped it in 2016 to participate in Dare to Bare.)

After running 15 miles and 16 miles the last two weekends, I think it’s safe to say I took for granted how tough a half marathon can be. While I didn’t race the distance, 13 miles is still freaking far.

This half marathon course (and full marathon course) runs through Southampton and we had a warm, sunshine-filled, blue sky day, which for runners, can be terrible. I prefer a little cloud cover, maybe a nice chill in the air? Light rain would be agreeable, too. This sport can bring out the vampire in you.

Hamptons half course map

Hamptons course map

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Good morning. I conquered a 16-mile run last weekend.  (The new longest run of my life.) Regular readers know, this is my first time training for a marathon. I knew the mental part of training would be hard, but I don’t think it’s possible to truly grapple with it until you’re in it.  The physical challenge is easy enough to predict. Of course running for hours is grueling. Running for 20 minutes teaches you that. But the mind stuff? That gets exponentially tougher with increased time/distance. (You know, for me at least.)

It was so easy to write down the distances to create a training plan. Super easy – fun even – to add them to my Google calendar and to map out routes on Strava. But the night before I was slated to run 16 miles, I was in a state of disbelief. My 15-mile run was TOUGH even though it was entirely flat. The idea that I was going to run 16-miles in the Berkshires with no bathrooms and tons of hills seemed, quite frankly, preposterous.

berkshire running

running from MA to NY (and back)

On Saturday, the morning of the run, I woke up with no desire to get out the door. But I did, of course, get out the door. I committed to running the first miles at a very slow pace and that was very necessary since the first 3+ miles were straight up hill. I stopped a ton those first 3 miles.

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Do you use a mantra when you run? I don’t. On an ideal run, my mind is blank. For those Harry Potter fans out there (and no spoilers please, I’m on Book 6), I think I may have a knack for Occlumency, that’s how empty my head is when I run (at least when I’m lucky).

SNAPE

But I know other people who use motivational phrases to keep themselves positive during a grueling workout. An NBC affiliate in Chicago has 26 suggested mantras (one per mile, as it were) in advance of the nearing Chicago Marathon.  Has anyone tried something like this? Does it work? How do you possibly remember 26 lines while you’re running?

Here’s last week workouts:

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Marathon training makes you do crazy things.

I’m headed to a wedding in Bermuda this weekend. I heard it’s pretty impossible to do a long run outside in Bermuda because the roads have no shoulder.  In order to stay on track with my training plan I decided to run 10 miles before work on Thursday. Maybe you’re an early riser and this isn’t a wackadoo concept to you. But for me, waking up at 5:30am to do anything other than catch a flight is either a miracle or a mistake. This is my story.

10 mile run central park

This is the route of the run so you can follow along. Yes I did run through water. There is a lot you don’t know about me.

Thoughts by mile, start time: 5:55am.

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I was not compensated for this post, but I did receive a complimentary session at the Urban Wellness Clinic. All opinions and most jokes are my own.

A month ago, the lovely folks at the Urban Wellness Clinic reached out and invited me to meet with Dr. Emily Kiberd, a New York City-based chiropractor and luxury wellness media expert in pain management and movement therapy.

I did a little research and learned that Urban Wellness Clinic is a sought after wellness center located in the building above Quality Italian (57th and 6th Ave), you know the place with the famed chicken parm pizza? Personally, I think it’s much too salty, but that’s commentary for a different venue.

Anyway, people seem to love Urban Wellness Clinic. Just check out their endless stream of 5-star Yelp reviews. Dr. Kiberd works with a number of New York Athletic Club athletes and Olympic hopefuls. So sure, yes, I would love to check this place out.

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