Hi everyone, happy Wednesday. It’s been a crazy week in America. I can’t stop thinking about what happened in Virginia this weekend and I couldn’t come here and hop into my weekly recap without expressing how horrified I am. The Nazi rally in Charlottesville and our President’s empty, late response have left me nauseous and angry. It’s 2017 and I can’t believe I live in a country where the President’s first instinct is that Nazis and not-Nazis are to blame for a White Supremacists rally. I am screaming livid that there even was a White Supremacist rally and that Nazi flags are being waved at all. If you have a good way to get involved in fighting for kindness and equality, let me know, I want in.

In fitness news, I’m in week 6 of training for the NYC marathon. Following Hal Higdon’s plan, week 6 was a “drop back” week which means this weekend run was shorter than week 5’s weekend run. Here’s some background on why most marathon training plans have cutback or drop back weeks weeks written by folks who know more about running than I do.

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This Sunday, I ran the Guido’s Gr8t Road Race in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

I signed up for this small town race in March, a testament to my neurosis that I felt the need to commit to a race that most definitely wouldn’t sell out (fewer than 90 people ran it) five months in advance. The first 75 sign ups were promised a tech-t, and I love a good race shirt. I was #3 to sign up. Awkward? 

Guido's Gr8t-T

Guido’s Gr8t-T

This 8-mile race was run by the Berkshire Running Center, a sneaker store in Pittsfield, Massachusetts that I’ve never been to.  It started and ended at Guido’s, at high-end supermarket that I love in Great Barrington, not too far from Matt’s parents’ house.
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There are 93 days until the NYC Marathon. Past NYC marathon runners: How did you do it?! How did you train in this miserable heat?  Send advice!

Last weekend we escaped to Maine to visit Acadia National Park. We LOVED it. I wrote about hiking and bike in Maine. Check out those posts here:

Hiking in Acadia: Beehive Trail, Gorge Path Trail and The Great Head Trail

Biking the carriage roads in Acadia National Park

Here’s the full recap from week four of marathon training:

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Acadia National Park has 45 miles of carriage roads built in the early half of the 1900s by the Rockefeller family. (Well you know, they paid for it.)

The Rockefellers wanted to create a car-free way to enjoy Mount Desert Island. Today, these dirt and gravel packed paths are used for biking, running and walking (though as the name implies, horses were once more prominent). The carriage roads sounded a lot like to me like the bridle path in Central Park, and for some reason, I assumed they would be largely without incline.

biking acadia national park

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